Thursday 22nd February 2018

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When Do I Get To Sing My Way

Sparks

No, no use in lecturing them, or in threatening them
They will just say “who are you”
Is that a question or not, and you see that the plot
Is predictable, not new
But you’re still stunned at the things you will do

No, no use in taking their time or in wasting two dimes
On a call to God knows who
When all you feel is the rain and it’s hard to be vain
When no person looks at you
So just be gracious and wait in the queue

So when do I get to sing “My Way”
When do I get to feel like Sinatra felt
When do I get to sing “My Way”
In heaven or hell
When do I get to do it my way
When do I get to feel like Sid Vicious felt
When do I get to sing “My Way”
In heaven or hell

Yes, it’s a tradition they say, like a bright Christmas Day
And traditions must go on
And though I say, yes I see, no I really don’t see
Is my smiley face still on?
Sign your name with an X, mow the lawn

They’ll introduce me, “Hello, hello”
Women seduce me and champagne flows
Then the lights go low
There’s only one song I know

There, this home which once was serene, now is home to the screams
And to flying plates and shoes
But I have no souvenirs of these crackerjack years
Not a moment I could choose
And not one offer that I could refuse

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The Man Who Invented Christmas

Two years after the success of Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens (Dan Stevens) is suffering financial hardship from the failure of his last three books. Rejected by his publishers, he sets out to write a new book to restore his finances. Seeing inspiration around London, most notably a rich man’s funeral that is largely unattended, he begins writing A Christmas Carol, due in six weeks in order to be published by Christmas. As Charles begins to develop his story, he interacts with the characters he is writing about, most notably Ebenezer Scrooge (Christopher Plummer). Helping Dickens is one of his servants, Tara, an Irish immigrant who is literate and able to provide advice.

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While writing his book, Charles is greeted by the arrival of his father, John Dickens (Jonathan Pryce), who views him as immature and fiscally irresponsible. Charles’s relationship with his family is increasingly strained as he struggles to finish the book in time, as he is unable to resolve Scrooge’s story. Hearing that Charles intends to let Tiny Tim die, Tara suggests a resolution for Scrooge by having him save Tiny Tim instead. Charles rejects her help, and soon sends her away from his house in a fit of rage. Additionally, Charles has a falling out with his father and sends him away upon learning that he has been selling Charles’s signature.

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It is revealed that much of Charles’s animosity towards his father is from his childhood embarrassment of working in a blacking factory after his family was taken to debtor’s prison. Returning to the long-abandoned factory, Charles is forced to confront his own insecurities through Scrooge. Charles realizes that his story should be one of redemption, and races home to finish his manuscript. As he leaves to submit it to his illustrator, he encounters Tara, and invites her back. His wife suggests he do the same with his father, who is about to board a train to leave London. Reconnecting with his family, Charles submits the manuscript in time for publishing before Christmas. The film ends with the Dickens family celebrating the holidays, while a title text explains the overnight success of A Christmas Carol, and its lasting impact on the Christmas holiday.

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