Friday 22nd February 2019

Heart on My Sleeve

Gallagher and Lyle

I wear my heart on my sleeve,
I’m not afraid to say what i mean,
Mean what i say.
I set myself up, let myself down,
I may be a fool to spread it around.
But i just wanna let you know,
Sometimes i find it so hard not to show,
So i sigh and i let my feelings go.
I wear my heart on my sleeve,
Don’t count the cost,
If i can’t live in love then surely i’ve lost.
You tend to get burned, tend to get bruised,
But it’s my life whatever i choose.
Oh, i just wanna let you know,
Sometimes i, i find it so hard not to show,
So i sigh and i let my feelings go.
I wear my heart on my sleeve,
I wear my heart on my sleeve.
You tend to get burned, tend to get bruised,
But it’s my life whatever i choose.
Oh, i just wanna let you know,
‘Cause sometimes i find it so hard not to show,
So i sigh, but, baby, you’re not alone.
You wear your heart on your sleeve,
You wear your heart on your sleeve.
I wear my heart on my sleeve,
I wear my heart on my sleeve.
I wear my heart on my sleeve,
I wear my heart on my sleeve,
I wear my heart on my sleeve,
Mm, my heart on my sleeve,
Baby, you know, i wear my heart on my sleeve,
Oh, my heart on my sleeve.
You wear your heart on your sleeve,
I wear my heart on my sleeve.

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The Chamberlain Clock is an Edwardian, cast-iron, clock tower in the Jewellery Quarter of Birmingham, England. It was erected in 1903 to mark Joseph Chamberlain’s tour of South Africa between 26 December 1902 and 25 February 1903, after the end of the Second Boer War. The clock was unveiled during Chamberlain’s lifetime, in January 1904[1] by Mary Crowninshield Endicott, Joseph Chamberlain’s third wife.

Standing at the junction of Vyse and Frederick Streets with Warstone Lane, it is now a local landmark and symbol of the Quarter. Chamberlain had been a resident on Frederick Street and had also helped jewellers through his campaign work to abolish Plate Duties – a tax affecting jewellery tradesmen of the time. The timepiece was originally powered by a clockwork winding handle.

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Warstone Lane Cemetery, also called Brookfields Cemetery, Church of England Cemetery, or Mint Cemetery (from the adjacent Birmingham Mint), is a cemetery dating from 1847 in Birmingham, England. It is one of two cemeteries in the city’s Jewellery Quarter, in Hockley (the other being Key Hill Cemetery).

A major feature is the two tiers of catacombs, whose unhealthy vapours led to the Birmingham Cemeteries Act which required that non-interred coffins should be sealed with lead or pitch.

The foundation stone for the chapel was laid on 6 April 1847. The blue brick gate lodge building, designed by J. R. Hamilton and J. M. Medland and built in 1847–8, survives, and is a Grade II listed building. The cemetery is itself Grade II on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. The cemetery was originally reserved for members of the established Church of England, whereas Key Hill (opened in 1836) was non-denominational, and was therefore favoured by nonconformists.

On the night of 11 December 1940, all but the tower and classical west portico of St Thomas’ Church, Bath Row, was destroyed by German bombs. The church was not rebuilt. The grounds were laid out for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 when the gravestones were removed and the dead reinterred at Warstone Lane Cemetery. The gardens were re-designed as the St. Thomas’s Peace Garden in 1995 in commermoration of the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II.

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The War Stone rock in Warstone Lane Cemetery in the Jewellery Quarter. It is a glacial erratic made from the volcanic rock felstone, which was carried here from its parent rock in Wales by glacial ice and deposited as the ice melted. Originally it was known as the Hoar Stone, which was likely derived from the Old English har stan feld, meaning ‘boundary stone field. It was used as a parish boundary where the manors of Aston, Birmingham and Handsworth met. It has lay in the area for many thousands of years in peace and tranquility until the industrial revolution hit and the sprawling urban landscape of Birmingham and it’s emerging Jewellery quarter quickly developed around it. Today it remains as a monument to the past and has been located on a sandstone plinth with the following inscription:

“This felsite boulder was deposited near here

by a glacier during the Ice Age: being at one

time used as a parish boundary mark, it

was known as the ‘Hoar Stone’ of which the

modern War Stone is a corruption”.

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