Archive for March, 2019

Sunday 24th March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 24, 2019 by bishshat

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St Peters Church Binton 

There has been a church on the site since at least 1286. The current church was built in 1875 and has views south over the river Avon, Warwickshire and the Cotswolds. It was built by the Conway family (the owners of the manor of Binton) and mainly paid for by the wife of Francis Seymour, 5th Marquess of Hertford. One 19th-century rector of the church had stated that the village’s inhabitants were mainly agricultural workers and thus unable to contribute to the costs of maintaining the church, meaning he had to seek contributions from the local gentry instead.

Signs of the original church remain, however. A picture of the original church can be seen at the back of the current church. There is a 15th-century font and cover and a mediaeval parish chest with three locks and bound with iron bands. Furthermore, there is a stained-glass window in memory of Sir John Greville, who died in 1444 and was an MP in seven Parliaments. He is buried at All Saints Church, Weston-on-Avon. The window depicts the arms of the Greville family of Milcote. There is also a piece of wood depicting the royal coat of arms. It must date from 1714–1801 as it includes the white horse of Hanover. Finally, by the gate to enter the churchyard, there are steps built into the wall, so as to avoid using the gate. The purpose of these was for people arriving to church by horseback could easily dismount,there is still a ring by these steps where the horses would be tied.

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The Scott Window

The Scott Window, panel 4 (detail): searchers erect a memorial cairn
The main feature of the church of St Peter is a memorial window by Kempe (1915), dedicated to Robert Falcon Scott and his co-explorers who died in their failed attempt to return from the South Pole. The window shows four scenes of the 1912 expedition. Scott had married Kathleen Bruce, sister of the Reverend Lloyd Harvey Bruce, Binton’s rector 1906–24. Scott frequently visited the Rectory (now The Grange). Alongside the window is a memorial cross for the Revd Bruce, with a bronze sculpture of Christ designed by Kathleen.

The church has one bell, cast by Henry Bagley of Chacombe in 1669.

Just to the right of the church porch is the tomb of William Jackson and his wife, who lived in “Springback”, now The Old Wellhouse. Jackson provided the stone wellhead known as “Buckwell” or “Lion’s Mouth” by piping water from a well in his own garden.

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Little Lies

Fleetwood Mac

If I could turn the page
In time then I’d rearrange just a day or two
Close my, close my, close my eyes
But I couldn’t find a way
So I’ll settle for one day to believe in you
Tell me, tell me, tell me lies
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
(Tell me lies, tell me, tell me lies)
Oh, no, no you can’t disguise
(You can’t disguise, no you can’t disguise)
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
Although I’m not making plans
I hope that you understand there’s a reason why
Close your, close your, close your eyes
No more broken hearts
We’re better off apart let’s give it a try
Tell me, tell me, tell me lies
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
(Tell me lies, tell me, tell me lies)
Oh, no, no you can’t disguise
(You can’t disguise, no you can’t disguise)
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
If I could turn the page
In time then I’d rearrange just a day or two
Close my, close my, close my eyes
But I couldn’t find a way
So I’ll settle for one day to believe in you
Tell me, tell me, tell me lies
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
(Tell me lies, tell me, tell me lies)
Oh, no, no you can’t disguise
(You can’t disguise, no you can’t disguise)
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
(Tell me lies, tell me, tell me lies)
Oh, no, no you can’t disguise
(You can’t disguise, no you can’t disguise)
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
(Tell me, tell me lies)

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Jump

Van Halen

I get up
And nothing gets me down
You got it tough
I’ve seen the toughest all around

And I know
Baby, just how you feel
You’ve got to roll
With the punches to get to what’s real

Oh can’t you see me standing here
I’ve got my back against the record machine
I ain’t the worst that you’ve seen
Oh can’t you see what I mean?

Might as well jump. Jump!
Might as well jump
Go ahead, jump. Jump!
Go ahead and jump

Ah-oh, hey you! Who said that?
Baby, how you been?
You say you don’t know
You won’t know until you begin

So can’t you see me standing here
I’ve got my back against the record machine
I ain’t the worst that you’ve seen
Oh can’t you see what I mean?

Might as well jump. Jump!
Go ahead and jump
Might as well jump. Jump!
Go ahead and jump
Jump!

Might as well jump. Jump!
Go ahead and jump
Get it and jump. Jump!
Go ahead and jump

Jump! Jump! Jump! Jump!

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Love Of My Life

Queen

Love of my life, you’ve hurt me
You’ve broken my heart
And now you leave me

Love of my life, can’t you see?
Bring it back, bring it back
Don’t take it away from me
Because you don’t know
What it means to me

Love of my life, don’t leave me
You’ve taken my love
(All my love)
You now desert me

Love of my life, can’t you see?
(Please bring it back)
Bring it back, bring it back
Don’t take it away from me
Because you don’t know
What it means to me

You will remember
When this is blown over
And everything’s all by the way
When I grow older
I will be there at your side
To remind you how I still love you
I still love you

Back, hurry back
Please, bring it back home to me
Because you don’t know
What it means to me

Love of my life
Love of my life

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Fat Bottomed Girls

Queen

Ah you gonna take me home tonight
Ah down beside that red fire light
Ah you gonna let it all hang out
Fat bottomed girls you make the rocking world go round

Hey I was just a skinny lad
Never knew no good from bad
But I knew life before I left my nursery (huh)
Left alone with big fat Fanny
She was such a naughty nanny
Heap big woman, you made a bad boy out of me

Hey hey!

I’ve been singing with my band
Across the water, across the land
I’ve seen every blue eyed floozy on the way (hey)
But their beauty and their style
Went kind of smooth after a while
Take me to them dirty ladies every time

C’mon!

Ah, won’t you take me home tonight?
Ah, down beside your red fire light
Ah, and you give it all you got
Fat bottomed girls you make the rocking world go round
Fat bottomed girls you make the rocking world go round

Hey, listen here
Now I got mortgages and homes
I got stiffness in the bones
Ain’t no beauty queens in this locality (I tell you)
Oh, but I still get my pleasure
Still got my greatest treasure
Heap big woman you done made a big man of me (now get this)

Oh (I know), you gonna take me home tonight (please)
Oh, down beside that red fire light
Oh, you gonna let it all hang out
Fat bottomed girls you make the rocking world go round (yeah)
Fat bottomed girls you make the rocking world go round

Get on your bikes and ride

Ooh, yeah, oh, yeah, them fat bottomed girls
Fat bottomed girls, yeah, yeah, yeah
Allright
Ride ’em come on
Fat bottomed girls
Yeah, yeah, right

434gg

With the eyes of a child
You must come out and see
That your world’s spinning ’round
And through life you will be
A small part
Of a hope
Of a love
That exists
In the eyes of a child you will see

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Friday 22nd March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 22, 2019 by bishshat

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The Chain

Fleetwood Mac

Listen to the wind blow, watch the sun rise
Running in the shadows, damn your love, damn your lies
And if, you don’t love me now
You will never love me again
I can still hear you saying
You would never break the chain (Never break the chain)
And if you don’t love me now
You will never love me again
I can still hear you saying
You would never break the chain (Never break the chain)
Listen to the wind blow, down comes the night
Running in the shadows, damn your love, damn your lies
Break the silence, damn the dark, damn the light
And if you don’t love me now
You will never love me again
I can still hear you saying
You would never break the chain (Never break the chain)
And if you don’t love me now
You will never love me again
I can still hear you saying
You would never break the chain (Never break the chain)
And if you don’t love me now
You will never love me again
I can still hear you saying
You would never break the chain (Never break the chain)
Chain keep us together (running in the shadow)

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DRS Hire Class 68012 Chiltern Railways Mainline – Silver and Grey

Thursday 21st March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 22, 2019 by bishshat

Go Your Own Way

Fleetwood Mac

Loving you
Isn’t the right thing to do
How can I ever change things that I feel?

If I could
Baby I’d give you my world
How can I
When you won’t take it from me?

You can go your own way
Go your own way
You can call it another lonely day
You can go your own way
Go your own way

Tell me why
Everything turned around
Packing up
Shacking up’s all you wanna do

If I could
Baby I’d give you my world
Open up
Everything’s waiting for you

You can go your own way
Go your own way
You can call it another lonely day
You can go your own way
Go your own way

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Second Hand News

Fleetwood Mac

I know there’s nothing to say
Someone has taken my place
When times go bad
When times go rough
Won’t you lay me down in tall grass
And let me do my stuff

I know I got nothin’ on you
I know there’s nothing to do
When times go bad
And you can’t get enough
Won’t you lay me down in the tall grass
And let me do my stuff

One thing I think you should know
I ain’t gonna miss you when you go
Been down so long
I’ve been tossed around enough
Couldn’t you just
Let me go down and do my stuff

I know you’re hopin’ to find
Someone who’s gonna give you peace of mind
When times go bad
When times go rough
Won’t you lay me down in tall grass
And let me do my stuff

I’m just second hand news
I’m just second hand news

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Don’t Stop

Fleetwood Mac

If you wake up and don’t want to smile
If it takes just a little while
Open your eyes and look at the day
You’ll see things in a different way

Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow
Don’t stop, it’ll soon be here
It’ll be here better than before
Yesterday’s gone, yesterday’s gone

Why not think about times to come?
And not about the things that you’ve done?
If your life was bad to you
Just think what tomorrow will do

Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow
Don’t stop, it’ll soon be here
It’ll be here better than before
Yesterday’s gone, yesterday’s gone

All I want is to see you smile
If it takes just a little while
I know you don’t believe that it’s true
I never meant any harm to you
Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow
Don’t stop, it’ll soon be here
It’ll be here better than before
Yesterday’s gone, yesterday’s gone

Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow
Don’t stop, it’ll soon be here
It’ll be here better than before
Yesterday’s gone, yesterday’s gone

Don’t you look back
Don’t you look back
Don’t you look back
Don’t you look back

Wednesday 20th March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 22, 2019 by bishshat

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MAGIC REALISM: ART IN WEIMAR GERMANY 1919-33

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Encounter the uncanny and mysterious through the art of the Weimar Republic

Tate Modern will explore German art from between the wars in a year-long, free exhibition, drawing upon the rich holdings of The George Economou Collection.

These loans offer a rare opportunity to view a range of artworks not ordinarily on public display, and to see a small selection of key Tate works returned to the context in which they were originally created and exhibited nearly one hundred years ago.

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This presentation explores the diverse practices of a number of different artists, including Otto Dix, George Grosz, Albert Birkle and Jeanne Mammen. Although the term ‘magic realism’ is today commonly associated with the literature of Latin America, it was inherited from the artist and critic Franz Roh who invented it in 1925 to describe a shift from the art of the expressionist era, towards cold veracity and unsettling imagery. In the context of growing political extremism, the new realism reflected a fluid social experience as well as inner worlds of emotion and magic.

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Germany’s Weimar Republic, established between the end of World War I and the Nazi rise to power, was a thriving laboratory of art and culture. As the country experienced unprecedented and often tumultuous social, economic, and political upheaval, many artists rejected Expressionism in favor of a new realism to capture this emerging society. Dubbed Neue Sachlichkeit—New Objectivity—its adherents turned a cold eye on the new Germany: its desperate prostitutes, crippled war veterans, and alienated urban landscapes, but also its emancipated New Woman, modern architecture, and mass-produced commodities.

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Rudolf Schlichter, “The Artist with Two Hanged Women” (1924)
Schlichter’s painting is as disturbing as anything in the whole show. It reflects both the Weimar obsession with “lust murder”, wherein women are the fetishised objects of sexual violence, and the high suicide rate of 1920s Germany, but offers nothing by way of context. The aghast expression of the painter himself (a hollow sketch, set against the fully realised dead women) mirrors the viewer’s own.

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New Objectivity: Modern German Art in the Weimar Republic, 1919–1933 is the first comprehensive exhibition in the United States to explore the dominant artistic trends of this period. Organized around five thematic sections and featuring 180 works by more than 50 artists, the exhibition mixes painting, photography, and works on paper to bring them into a visual dialogue. Key figures of modernism, such as Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, George Grosz, August Sander, and Christian Schad are featured alongside lesser-known artists such as Aenne Biermann, Heinrich Maria Davringhausen, Hans Finsler, Carl Grossberg, Lotte Jacobi, Alexander Kanoldt, and Georg Schrimpf.

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Tuesday 19th March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 22, 2019 by bishshat

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Monday 18th March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 22, 2019 by bishshat

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The Mozarts’ first London lodgings were above a barber’s shop in Cecil Court, near St Martin-in-the-Fields. Letters of introduction from Paris proved effective; on 27 April 1764, four days after their arrival, the children were playing before King George III and his 19-year-old German queen, Charlotte Sophia.
A second royal engagement was fixed for 19 May, at which Wolfgang was asked by the king to play pieces by Handel, Johann Christian Bach and Carl Friedrich Abel. He was allowed to accompany the queen as she sang an aria, and he later improvised on the bass part of a Handel aria from which, according to Leopold, he produced “the most beautiful melody in such a manner that everyone was astonished”.

Many of the nobility and gentry were leaving town for the summer, but Leopold reckoned that most would return for the king’s birthday celebrations on 4 June, and accordingly organised a concert for the 5th.
This was deemed a success, and Leopold hastened to arrange for Wolfgang to appear at a benefit concert for a maternity hospital on 29 June, at Ranelagh Pleasure Gardens. Leopold apparently saw this effort to support charitable works as “a way to earn the love of this very special nation”. Wolfgang was advertised as “the celebrated and astonishing Master Mozart, a Child of Seven Years of Age…” (he was in fact eight), “justly esteemed the most extraordinary Prodigy, and most amazing Genius, that has appeared in any Age”. On 8 July there was a private performance at the Grosvenor Square home of the Earl of Thanet, from which Leopold returned with an inflammation of the throat and other worrying symptoms. “Prepare your heart to hear one of the saddest events”, he wrote to Hagenauer in anticipation of his own imminent demise.[45] He was ill for several weeks, and for the sake of his health the family moved from their Cecil Court lodgings to a house in the countryside, at 180 Ebury Street, then considered part of the village of Chelsea.

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Two Georgian terraced houses in brown brick with the bottom storey in stucco, that on the right with a brown circular plaque marking Mozart’s residence
180 Ebury Street, Pimlico, where the Mozarts stayed in the summer of 1765
During Leopold’s illness performances were impossible, so Wolfgang turned to composition. According to the writer and musician Jane Glover, Wolfgang was inspired to write symphonies after meeting Johann Christian Bach.
It is not clear when this meeting occurred, or when Wolfgang first heard J. C. Bach’s symphonies, although he had played the older composer’s harpsichord works in his May 1764 royal recital.
Wolfgang soon completed his Symphony No. 1 in E flat, K. 16, and started his No. 4 in D major, K. 19 (which Zaslaw concludes was more likely composed, or at least completed, in The Hague).
The D major symphony has, in Hildesheimer’s words, “an originality of melody and modulation which goes beyond the routine methods of his contemporaries”.
These are Wolfgang’s first orchestral writings, although Zaslaw hypothesises a theoretical “Symphony No. 0” from sketches in Wolfgang’s musical notebook.
Three lost symphonies, identified in the Köchel catalogue of Mozart’s works only by their incipits (first few bars of music), may also have originated from the London period.
Other works composed by Wolfgang in London include several instrumental sonatas, the jewel of which, according to Hildesheimer, is the C major sonata for piano, four hands, K. 19d.

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A set of violin sonatas, with extra flute and cello parts, was dedicated to Queen Charlotte at her request, and presented to her with an appropriate inscription in January 1765. Wolfgang also wrote his first vocal works, the motet “God is our Refuge”, K. 20, and the tenor aria Va, dal furor portata, K. 21. At the end of September, with Leopold’s recovery, the family moved back to central London, to lodgings in Thrift Street (later 20 Frith Street), Soho. These lodgings were located conveniently close to several concert rooms, and to the residences of both J. C. Bach and Carl Friedrich Abel. Bach, a son of Johann Sebastian Bach, soon became a family friend; Nannerl later recalled Bach and the eight-year-old Wolfgang playing a sonata together, taking turns to play a few bars individually, and that “anyone not watching would have thought it was played by one person alone”. There is no record that the Mozarts met Abel, but Wolfgang knew his symphonies, perhaps through the medium of the annual Bach-Abel concert series, and was much influenced by them.

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On 25 October, at King George’s invitation, the children played at the celebrations marking the fourth anniversary of the king’s accession. Their next public appearance was a concert on 21 February 1765, before a moderate audience—the date clashed with a Bach-Abel concert. Only one more London concert was given, on 13 May, but between April and June members of the public could go to the Mozarts’ lodgings where, for a five shilling fee, Wolfgang would perform his musical party pieces. During June both the “young Prodigies” performed daily at the Swan and Harp Tavern in Cornhill, the charge this time being a mere two shillings and sixpence. These were, as Sadie puts it, “Leopold’s last, desperate effort to extract guineas from the English public”.
Hildesheimer likens this part of the tour to a travelling circus, comparing the Mozarts to a family of acrobats.

The Mozarts left London for the continent on 24 July 1765. Before this, Leopold allowed Wolfgang to be subjected to a scientific examination, conducted by The Hon. Daines Barrington. A report, issued in Philosophical Transactions for the year 1770, confirms the truth of Wolfgang’s exceptional capabilities.
Practically the last act of the family in London was the gift to the British Museum of the manuscript copy of “God is our Refuge”.

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The last time I was at the Royal Hospital Chelsea would have been 1962 when I was ten years old. I visited my grandfather who was living there. I remembered it all being brown and very dark and dull. His room was also very tiny.

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Royal Hospital Chelsea begins over 300 years ago during the reign of King Charles II, whose vision for a home for veteran soldiers was brought to life by Sir Christopher Wren.

Until the 17th Century, the state made no specific provision for old and injured soldiers. Care for the poor and sick was provided by the religious foundations. Most of this provision ended following the dissolution of the monasteries during the reign of King Henry VIII.

In 1681, responding to the need to look after these soldiers, King Charles II (image right) issued a Royal Warrant authorising the building of the Royal Hospital Chelsea to care for those ‘broken by age or war’.

Sir Christopher Wren was commissioned to design and erect the building. Sir Stephen Fox was commissioned to secure the funds necessary to progress the build.

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The chosen site, set adjacent to the River Thames in the countryside of Chelsea contained the uncompleted building of the former ‘Chelsey College’. In 1692 work was finally completed and the first Chelsea Pensioners were admitted in February 1692 and by the end of March the full complement of 476 were in residence.

But it’s not just the buildings that have survived into modern times. King Charles II’s understanding that the country owes a debt of gratitude to its old soldiers informs the spirit of the Royal Hospital today. The residents of the Royal Hospital, known the world over as Chelsea Pensioners, have all served as ordinary soldiers in the Armed Forces at some point in their lives, and now, in their later years, find a warm welcome amidst the camaraderie and banter of their fellow veterans.

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The Eagle Tavern, Hammersmith 1857

The Eagle still stands, although an additional bay has been added since this picture was painted. Here we see the landlord in 1857, James Bott, standing proudly on the doorstep. The painting (like a visual business card) advertises all the establishment has to offer; including a fashionable Tea Garden.

Bott, who had previously run a number of other pubs in West London, took over the licence of ‘The Eagle’ in 1853, and managed it until his death in 1865. Already separated from his wife, he had three children with his much younger housekeeper, Elizabeth Baker. Perhaps the youngsters we see standing in front of the pub could be two of their three offspring? After Bott’s death, Elizabeth continued to run the pub.

The site where the Eagle stands – on the fringes of Hammersmith – remained largely rural until the coming of the railway in 1874. This opened up the area to residential development, and would have provided a new clientele of thirsty builders and commuters to The Eagle public house.

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This painting features a tavern in Hammersmith, London. It was commissioned by the landlord Mr Bott perhaps to commemorate changing the name from ‘The Lady of the Lake Inn’ to ‘The Eagle’. It is a wonderful depiction of Victorian life.

Mr Bott and his son are standing at the top of steps that lead to the front door. Positioned in the middle of the painting, higher than all the other characters, they appear very important. Mr Bott is wearing an apron to show he is hard working, while his son wears what could be a school uniform. A manservant is waiting to greet people to this popular place.

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In the foreground are people from all walks of life: rich and poor, young and old. Mr Bott appears to look over them all.

This painting not only shows how the Inn is the centre of the community but is also a successful advertisement. We discover that the Eagle Inn has a tea garden, coffee room and shop and Mr Bott makes a special drink called London Porter.

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Sunday 17th March 2019

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on March 22, 2019 by bishshat

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