Tuesday 11th September

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 11, 2018 by bishshat

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Joseph Agnello, Lad.118 Lt. Brian Ahearn, Bat.13 Eric Allen, Sqd.18 (D) Richard Allen, Lad.15 Cpt. James Amato, Sqd.1 Calixto Anaya Jr., Eng.4 Joseph Agnello, Lad.118 Lt. Brian Ahearn, Bat.13 Eric Allen, Sqd.18 (D) Richard Allen, Lad.15 Cpt. James Amato, Sqd.1 Calixto Anaya Jr., Eng.4 Joseph Angelini, Res.1 (D) Joseph Angelini Jr., Lad.4 Faustino Apostol Jr., Bat.2 David Arce, Eng.33 Louis Arena, Lad.5 (D) Carl Asaro, Bat.9 Lt. Gregg Atlas, Eng.10 Gerald Atwood, Lad.21
Gerald Baptiste, Lad.9 A.C. Gerard Barbara, Cmd. Ctr. Matthew Barnes, Lad.25 Arthur Barry, Lad.15 Lt.Steven Bates, Eng.235 Carl Bedigian, Eng.214 Stephen Belson, Bat.7 John Bergin, Res.5 Paul Beyer, Eng.6 Peter Bielfeld, Lad.42 Brian Bilcher, Sqd.1 Carl Bini, Res.5 Christopher Blackwell, Res.3 Michael Bocchino, Bat.48 Frank Bonomo, Eng.230 Gary Box, Sqd.1 Michael Boyle, Eng.33 Kevin Bracken, Eng.40 Michael Brennan, Lad.4 Peter Brennan, Res.4 Cpt. Daniel Brethel, Lad.24 (D) Cpt. Patrick Brown, Lad.3 Andrew Brunn, Lad.5 (D) Cpt. Vincent Brunton, Lad.105 F.M. Ronald Bucca Greg Buck, Eng.201 Cpt. William Burke Jr., Eng.21 A.C. Donald Burns, Cmd. Ctr. John Burnside, Lad.20 Thomas Butler, Sqd.1 Patrick Byrne, Lad.101
George Cain, Lad.7 Salvatore Calabro, Lad.101 Cpt. Frank Callahan, Lad.35 Michael Cammarata, Lad.11 Brian Cannizzaro, Lad.101 Dennis Carey, Hmc.1 Michael Carlo, Eng.230 Michael Carroll, Lad.3 Peter Carroll, Sqd.1 (D) Thomas Casoria, Eng.22 Michael Cawley, Lad.136 Vernon Cherry, Lad.118 Nicholas Chiofalo, Eng.235 John Chipura, Eng.219 Michael Clarke, Lad.2 Steven Coakley, Eng.217 Tarel Coleman, Sqd.252 John Collins, Lad.25 Robert Cordice, Sqd.1 Ruben Correa, Eng.74 James Coyle, Lad.3 Robert Crawford, Safety Lt. John Crisci, H.M. B.C. Dennis Cross, Bat.57 (D) Thomas Cullen III, Sqd. 41 Robert Curatolo, Lad.16
Lt. Edward D’Atri, Sqd.1 Michael D’Auria, Eng.40 Scott Davidson, Lad.118 Edward Day, Lad.11 B.C. Thomas DeAngelis, Bat. 8 Manuel Delvalle, Eng.5 Martin DeMeo, H.M. 1 David DeRubbio, Eng.226 Lt. Andrew Desperito, Eng.1 (D) B.C. Dennis Devlin, Bat.9 Gerard Dewan, Lad.3 George DiPasquale, Lad.2 Lt. Kevin Donnelly, Lad.3 Lt. Kevin Dowdell, Res.4 B.C. Raymond Downey, Soc. Gerard Duffy, Lad.21
Cpt. Martin Egan, Jr., Div.15 (D) Michael Elferis, Eng.22 Francis Esposito, Eng.235 Lt. Michael Esposito, Sqd.1 Robert Evans, Eng.33
B.C. John Fanning, H.O. Cpt. Thomas Farino, Eng.26 Terrence Farrell, Res.4 Cpt. Joseph Farrelly, Div.1 Dep. Comm. William Feehan, (D) Lee Fehling, Eng.235 Alan Feinberg, Bat.9 Michael Fiore, Res.5 Lt. John Fischer, Lad.20 Andre Fletcher, Res.5 John Florio, Eng.214 Lt. Michael Fodor, Lad.21 Thomas Foley, Res.3 David Fontana, Sqd.1 Robert Foti, Lad.7 Andrew Fredericks, Sqd.18 Lt. Peter Freund, Eng.55
Thomas Gambino Jr., Res.3 Chief of Dept. Peter Ganci, Jr. (D) Lt. Charles Garbarini, Bat.9 Thomas Gardner, Hmc.1 Matthew Garvey, Sqd.1 Bruce Gary, Eng.40 Gary Geidel, Res.1 B.C. Edward Geraghty, Bat.9 Dennis Germain, Lad.2 Lt. Vincent Giammona, Lad.5 James Giberson, Lad.35 Ronnie Gies, Sqd.288 Paul Gill, Eng.54 Lt. John Ginley, Eng.40 Jeffrey Giordano, Lad.3 John Giordano, Hmc.1 Keith Glascoe, Lad.21 James Gray, Lad.20 B.C. Joseph Grzelak, Bat.48 Jose Guadalupe, Eng.54 Lt. Geoffrey Guja, Bat.43 Lt. Joseph Gullickson, Lad.101
David Halderman, Sqd.18 Lt. Vincent Halloran, Lad.8 Robert Hamilton, Sqd.41 Sean Hanley, Lad.20 (D) Thomas Hannafin, Lad.5 Dana Hannon, Eng.26 Daniel Harlin, Lad.2 Lt. Harvey Harrell, Res.5 Lt. Stephen Harrell, Bat.7 Cpt. Thomas Haskell, Jr., Div.15 Timothy Haskell, Sqd.18 (D) Cpt. Terence Hatton, Res.1 Michael Haub, Lad.4 Lt. Michael Healey, Sqd.41 John Hefferman, Lad.11 Ronnie Henderson, Eng.279 Joseph Henry, Lad.21 William Henry, Res.1 (D) Thomas Hetzel, Lad.13 Cpt. Brian Hickey, Res.4 Lt. Timothy Higgins, S.O.C. Jonathan Hohmann, Hmc.1 Thomas Holohan, Eng.6 Joseph Hunter, Sqd.288 Cpt. Walter Hynes, Lad.13
Jonathan Ielpi, Sqd.288 Cpt. Frederick Ill Jr., Lad.2
William Johnston, Eng.6 Andrew Jordan, Lad.132 Karl Joseph, Eng.207 Lt. Anthony Jovic, Bat.47 Angel Juarbe Jr., Lad.12 Mychal Judge, Chaplain
Vincent Kane, Eng.22 B.C. Charles Kasper, S.O.C. Paul Keating, Lad.5 Richard Kelly Jr., Lad.11 Thomas R. Kelly, Lad.15 Thomas W. Kelly, Lad.105 Thomas Kennedy, Lad.101 Lt. Ronald Kerwin, Sqd.288 Michael Kiefer, Lad.132 Robert King Jr., Eng.33 Scott Kopytko, Lad.15 William Krukowski, Lad.21 Kenneth Kumpel, Lad.25 Thomas Kuveikis, Sqd.252
David LaForge, Lad.20 William Lake, Res.2 Robert Lane, Eng.55 Peter Langone, Sqd.252 Scott Larsen, Lad.15 Lt. Joseph Leavey, Lad.15 Neil Leavy, Eng.217 Daniel Libretti, Res.2 Carlos Lillo, Paramedic Robert Linnane, Lad.20 Michael Lynch, Eng.40 Michael Lynch, Lad.4 Michael Lyons, Sqd.41 Patrick Lyons, Sqd.252
Joseph Maffeo, Lad.101 William Mahoney, Res 4 Joseph Maloney, Lad.3 (D) B.C. Joseph Marchbanks Jr, Bat.12 Lt. Charles Margiotta, Bat.22 Kenneth Marino, Res.1 John Marshall, Eng.23 Lt. Peter Martin, Res.2 Lt. Paul Martini, Eng.23 Joseph Mascali, T.S.U. 2 Keithroy Maynard, Eng.33 Brian McAleese, Eng.226 John McAvoy, Lad.3 Thomas McCann, Bat.8 Lt. William McGinn, Sqd.18 B.C. William McGovern, Bat.2 (D) Dennis McHugh, Lad.13 Robert McMahon, Lad.20 Robert McPadden, Eng.23 Terence McShane, Lad.101 Timothy McSweeney, Lad.3 Martin McWilliams, Eng.22 Raymond Meisenheimer, Res.3 Charles Mendez, Lad.7 Steve Mercado, Eng.40 Douglas Miller, Res.5 Henry Miller Jr, Lad.105 Robert Minara, Lad.25 Thomas Mingione, Lad.132 Lt. Paul Mitchell, Bat.1 Capt. Louis Modafferi, Res.5 Lt. Dennis Mojica, Res.1 (D) Manuel Mojica, Sqd.18 (D) Carl Molinaro, Lad.2 Michael Montesi, Res.1 Capt. Thomas Moody, Div.1 B.C. John Moran, Bat.49 Vincent Morello, Lad.35 Christopher Mozzillo, Eng.55 Richard Muldowney Jr, Lad.07 Michael Mullan, Lad.12 Dennis Mulligan, Lad.2 Lt. Raymond Murphy, Lad.16
Lt. Robert Nagel, Eng.58 John Napolitano, Res.2 Peter Nelson, Res.4 Gerard Nevins, Res.1
Dennis O’Berg, Lad.105 Lt. Daniel O’Callaghan, Lad.4 Douglas Oelschlager, Lad.15 Joseph Ogren, Lad.3 Lt. Thomas O’Hagan, Bat.4 Samuel Oitice, Lad.4 Patrick O’Keefe, Res.1 Capt. William O’Keefe, Div.15 (D) Eric Olsen, Lad.15 Jeffery Olsen, Eng.10 Steven Olson, Lad.3 Kevin O’Rourke, Res.2 Michael Otten, Lad.35
Jeffery Palazzo, Res.5 B.C. Orio Palmer, Bat.7 Frank Palombo, Lad.105 Paul Pansini, Eng.10 B.C. John Paolillo, Bat.11 James Pappageorge, Eng.23 Robert Parro, Eng.8 Durrell Pearsall, Res.4 Lt. Glenn Perry, Bat.12 Lt. Philip Petti, Bat.7 Lt. Kevin Pfeifer, Eng. 33 Lt. Kenneth Phelan, Bat.32 Christopher Pickford, Eng.201 Shawn Powell, Eng.207 Vincent Princiotta, Lad.7 Kevin Prior, Sqd.252 B.C. Richard Prunty, Bat.2 (D)
Lincoln Quappe, Res.2 Lt. Michael Quilty, Lad.11 Ricardo Quinn, Paramedic
Leonard Ragaglia, Eng.54 Michael Ragusa, Eng.279 Edward Rall, Res.2 Adam Rand, Sqd.288 Donald Regan, Res.3 Lt. Robert Regan, Lad.118 Christian Regenhard, Lad.131 Kevin Reilly, Eng.207 Lt. Vernon Richard, Lad.7 James Riches, Eng.4 Joseph Rivelli, Lad.25 Michael Roberts, Eng.214 Michael E. Roberts, Lad.35 Anthony Rodriguez, Eng.279 Matthew Rogan, Lad.11 Nicholas Rossomando, Res.5 Paul Ruback, Lad.25 Stephen Russell, Eng.55 Lt. Michael Russo, S.O.C. B.C. Matthew Ryan, Bat.1
Thomas Sabella, Lad.13 Christopher Santora, Eng.54 John Santore, Lad.5 (D) Gregory Saucedo, Lad.5 Dennis Scauso, H.M. 1 John Schardt, Eng.201 B.C. Fred Scheffold, Bat.12 Thomas Schoales, Eng.4 Gerard Schrang, Res.3 (D) Gregory Sikorsky, Sqd.41 Stephen Siller, Sqd.1 Stanley Smagala Jr, Eng.226 Kevin Smith, H.M. 1 Leon Smith Jr, Lad 118 Robert Spear Jr, Eng.26 Joseph Spor, Res.3 B.C. Lawrence Stack, Bat.50 Cpt. Timothy Stackpole, Div.11 (D) Gregory Stajk, Lad.13 Jeffery Stark, Eng.230 Benjamin Suarez, Lad.21 Daniel Suhr, Eng.216 (D) Lt. Christopher Sullivan, Lad.111 Brian Sweeney, Res.1
Sean Tallon, Lad.10 Allan Tarasiewicz, Res.5 Paul Tegtmeier, Eng.4 John Tierney, Lad.9 John Tipping II, Lad.4 Hector Tirado Jr, Eng.23
Richard Vanhine, Sqd.41 Peter Vega, Lad.118 Lawrence Veling, Eng.235 John Vigiano II, Lad.132 Sergio Villanueva, Lad.132 Lawrence Virgilio, Sqd.18 (D)
Lt. Robert Wallace, Eng.205 Jeffery Walz, Lad. 9 Lt. Michael Warchola, Lad.5 (D) Capt. Patrick Waters, S.O.C. Kenneth Watson, Eng.214 Michael Weinberg, Eng.1 (D) David Weiss, Res.1 Timothy Welty, Sqd.288 Eugene Whelan, Eng.230 Edward White, Eng.230 Mark Whitford, Eng.23 Lt. Glenn Wilkinson, Eng.238 (D) B.C. John Williamson, Bat.6 (D) Capt. David Wooley, Lad.4
Raymond York, Eng.285

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Sunday 9th September 2018

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 9, 2018 by bishshat

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Denver 27 Seahawks 24

The Seahawks opened their season with a back-and-forth game at Denver, but ultimately were unable to come up with one final score, losing to the Broncos 27-24 at Broncos Stadium at Mile High.

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The Seahawks offense had its ups and downs in Sunday’s game, but it also came up with some big plays, most notably a 51-yard touchdown pass to Tyler Lockett, a 66-yard pass to Will Dissly, and a 24-yard run by Chris Carson that featured the second-year back hurdling a defensive back, landing and sprinting down the sideline.

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Unfortunately for the Seahawks they were also on the wrong end of too many big plays, with Denver capitalizing on some miscues in coverage to pick up huge chunks of yards. The Broncos, who finished with 470 yards of offense, scored on a 43-yard pass to Emmanuel Sanders, as well as on a 29-yard pass to running back Paul Lindsay, who found himself wide open down the sideline.

Friday 7th September 2018

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 8, 2018 by bishshat

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A Simple Game

Moody Blues

As time goes by you will see
That we’re going to be free
You and me, we’ll touch the sky
Can you see in your mind’s eye
That we are one
We’re all the same
And life is just a simple game

There, by your side, I will be
When this crazy world is free
Free from doubt
When it finds out
Exactly what we’re meant to be
That we are one
We’re all the same
And life is just a simple game

Thoughts of another day
Flashing through my head
Thinking how life could be
All of the things that our great men have said
Be what we want to be
What we deserve to be
What we are meant to be

As time goes by, you will see
That we’re going to be free
You and me, we’ll touch the sky
Can you see in your mind’s eye
That we are one
We’re all the same
And life is just a simple game

We’re gonna be free
Oohhh, gonna be free
Gonna be free
(Free, gonna be free, gonna be free, Oohhh)

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Thursday 6th September 2018

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 8, 2018 by bishshat

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Tuesday 4th September 2018

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 4, 2018 by bishshat

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Get It Right Next Time

Gerry Rafferty

Out on the street I was talkin’ to a man
He said “there’s so much of this life of mine that I don’t understand”
You shouldn’t worry, I said, that ain’t no crime
Cause if you get it wrong you’ll get it right next time (next time)

You need direction, yeah you need a name
When you’re standing in the crossroads every highway looks the same
After awhile you get to recognize the signs
So if you get it wrong you’ll get it right next time (next time)

Life is a liar yeah life is a cheat
It’ll lead you on and pull the ground from underneath your feet
No use complainin’, don’t you worry, don’t you whine
Cause if you get it wrong you’ll get it right next time (next time)

You gotta grow, you gotta learn by your mistakes
You gotta die a little everyday just to try to stay awake
When you believe there’s no mountain you can climb
And if you get it wrong you’ll get it right next time (next time)

Next time, hmmmmm

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Night Owl

Gerry Rafferty

Night comes down and finds you alone
In a space and time of your own
Lost in dreams in a world full of shadows.

Down the street the neon light shines
Offering refuge and hope to the blind
You stumble in with no thought of tomorrow.

Yes, I get a little lonely when the sun gets low
And I end looking for somewhere to go
Yes, I should know better but I can’t say no.

Oh no no no
No no no no

The lights are low and the Muzak is loud
You watch yourself as you play to the crowd
One more face in a palace of mirrors.

One more drink, you’re sailing away
One more dream but it’s looking ok
One more time to watch the flow of the river.

Yes, I get a little lonely when the sun gets low
And I end looking for somewhere to go
Yes, I should know better but I can’t say no.

Oh no no no
No no no no no no no oooooooh

Yes, I get a little lonely when the sun gets low
And I end looking for somewhere to go
Yes, I should know better but I can’t say no.

Oh no no no
No no no no

You’ve seen it all yeah you’ve seen it before
Like a fool you always come back for more
You live your life like there was no more tomorrow.

Night comes down and finds you alone
In a space and time of your own
Lost in dreams in a world full of shadows.

Yes, I get a little lonely when the sun gets low
And I end looking for somewhere to go
Yes, I should know better but I can’t say no.

Oh no no no
Oh no no no
No no no no
No no no no
No no
No no
Oooooooooooh

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Pretending

Eric Clapton

How many times must we tell the tale?
How many times must we fall?
Living in lost memory
You just recalled

Working on the sound of the band
Trying to get the music right
Two go out working
Three stay home at night

That’s when she said she was pretending
Like she knew the plan
That’s when I knew she was pretending
Pretending to understand

Pretending, pretending
Pretending, pretending

Satisfied but lost in love
Situations change
You’re never who you used to think you are
How strange

I get lost in alibis
Sadness can’t prevail
Everybody knows strong love
Can’t fail

Don’t be pretending about how you feel

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I noticed this metal screen in Leamington and decided to find out why it would be there it turns out that Samuel Lockhart (1851–1933) was a famous Victorian elephant trainer and the second child of the famous Lockhart circus family. His work with elephants took him all over the UK, including Royal command performances in front of Queen Victoria, Europe (where he ran his own circus France) and in the USA, where he worked for the famous Ringling Brothers Circus from 1896 to 1901. He has appeared in several historical books on the circus, including one children’s book completely dedicated to him (Elephants at Royal Leamington Spa by Janet Storrie, 1990), and the English town of Leamington Spa has several areas named after his most famous group of elephants “The Three Graces”.

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The world’s foremost elephant trainer began his working life as a circus acrobat and when he died was described by the Leamington Courier newspaper as a ‘retired giant of the entertainment industry’. The dapper little man with the magnificent white moustache was one of Leamington’s most recognisable residents in the years between the two world wars.

Early Years. Sam Lockhart was born in County Durham in 1850. His mother Hannah (nee´ Pinder), the daughter of a well-to-do French wine exporter, had run away from home as a young girl to form a circus with her brothers. Young Samuel’s father, also Samuel was an equestrian, stilt walker, acrobat and clown who described himself in the census returns as a ‘Professor of Gymnastics’ . His proper name was Locker but shortly after he married Hannah, she persuaded him to change the family surname to Lockhart which sounded ‘less common’. Interestingly, Samuel junior’s birth was registered under the old name of Locker.

Flying Trapeze Artists. The Lockhart had family ties with the Ginnetts, a circusfamily some of whom lived in Leamington in the mid nineteenth century and we know from newspaper reports that Sam and his brother George were in Leamington in 1869. The two young men were accomplished trapeze artists and gymnasts, apart from being talented horsemen. In 1869 they appeared as ‘The Flying Trapeze’ on the bill for George Ginnett’s Drawing Room Royal Circus. The rather grand name for the show was somewhat at odds with what we learn was little more than a temporary wooden building erected in Lower Bedford Street on the open ground that then existed in front of the ‘Pepper Box’ chapel. French newspapers spoke of the ‘wonderful performance of the young Lockhart’. Sam and his brother also performed their gymnastic act at the newly erected Victoria Pavilion in the Collonade and appeared in several Leamington pantomimes for Ginnett’s Model Cirque in the early 1870’s whilst also touring on the continent. Unfortunately, both Sam and George sustained injuries while performing and rehearsing their act and in 1875 a serious injury to George brought their double-act to a premature end. In the same year Sam married Alice Pavier a 19 year-old tailor’s daughter at Leamington Parish Church.

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Sam the Elephant Trainer. Within a few years, Sam had travelled to Burma with Wilson’s Great World Circus and in 1881 in the timber yard of the Bombay & Burma Trading company in Molmien, he saw two baby elephants which he purchased and arranged to have shipped back to London on the ship SS City of Venice. Quite why Sam developed an interest in elephants is not known. It has been suggested that he saw young native children teaching elephants to do various tricks and realised that an elephant act would make a popular circus attraction and he very much wanted to continue as a circus performer, circus was in his blood.What we do know is that Sam christened his two baby elephants Jock and Jenny and almost by accident he began a career as an elephant trainer. Over the next thirty years Sam imported and trained a number of elephants and became the foremost elephant trainer in the world. His most famous troupe were three female elephants Wilhelmina, Trilby and Haddie known collectively as the Three

Graces. His original elephants Jock and Jenny generally performed together and appeared with Sam at Olympia in 1887 for Queen Victoria. Sam led a rather peripatetic life, living in Leamington for short periods when not touring with his elephants. Apart from performing throughout Britain, Sam also took his act to France, Germany and Belgium and much further afield to North America entertaining audiences in New York, San Francisco and Detroit. For some years his act was booked as part of a Vaudeville bill in large theatres and as a speciality act in large circuses. He appeared with Buffalo Bill’s ‘Wild West Show’ and with Ringling Brothers ‘Worlds Greatest Show’. The logistics involved in transporting large elephants across the Atlantic and then by rail across America were, to say the least, challenging.

It is difficult to determine where Sam and his elephants were at any given date and it is only through random mentions in The Era newspaper that we can compile a rather sketchy outline of events.In 1892 he was on the bill at the Theatre Royal in Leamington with a troupe of six elephants and in the same year he appeared with these in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show before leaving for shows in Rheims. During the 1890’s Sam was on foreign soil for much of the time and returned to Leamington infrequently. His father died in 1894 when Sam was in Antwerp with a circus and in 1897 his wife Alice died at the young age of 41 at the house named La Pallas in Warwick New Road, Leamington where they then lived. The same year he was again topping the bill at the Theatre Royal in Leamington with six elephants. He also found time in 1897 to put on a show at Warwick Castle for Lady Warwick to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. Daisy Warwick was a close friend of Sams and she also owned an elephant which was kept on the river island at the castle.

Some Unresolved Questions. Quite where Sam housed the dozen elephants that he owned at various times isn’t known. It may well be that the large elephants did not return to England but stayed in America in the periods when they were not performing. We do know that what Sam called his ‘baby elephants’ were at some period quartered in a former carriage house in Morton Street which still bears the name of The Elephant House. Accommodating fully-grown elephants in a busy town is an altogether different matter and doubtless posed many problems and we have no information about this aspect of Sam’s working life. It goes without saying that large animals like elephants would need exercising on a regular basis and they would have to be walked to and from the railway station when they were en route to the docks for embarkation by ship. We can but speculate as to where Sam would have quartered the six elephants that made two appearances each day at the Theatre Royal for a week in 1897.

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It was inevitable that a degree of folklore sprang up about Sam and his elephants and many stories gained currency about how they were walked down the Parade and bathed in the river Leam. In the preparation of this article I went to great lengths to try to establish the historical veracity of this story but it has to be said that no confirmatory evidence of any sort was found. Not one of the respected Leamington historians mention such an event and neither Morley nor Manning who wrote at the turn of the century make any reference to it or indeed to Sam Lockhart and his elephants. The local newspaper The Leamington Spa Courier never once mentions such an eminently news worthy story. One wonders why it was that if such an unusual event did occur in a conformist town like Leamington Spa why none of the many enterprising photographic studios managed to take a photograph of it, at least one of them operated from the Collonade alongside the river. Similarly, the oft-repeated story about the noise made by elephants splashing about in the river and disturbing worship in the parish church is not supported by evidence of any sort. The All Saints parish magazines for the period are silent on the subject. The water wash next to Victoria bridge from which the elephants are said to have accessed the water was constructed in 1880 and was in existence for little over a year. A replacement waterway was built upstream next to Oldham’s mill in August 1882 when the land between the bridge and the newly-built post office was levelled and paved by the Town Council as a town improvement. These river slipways are always referred to as waterways and were gated to restrict public access. Their original purpose was to provide a public watering place for the large number of hunters and carriage horses then stabled in the town. My scepticism about the elephants being bathed in the river Leam was reinforced when I read in the local paper about the truly dreadful state of the river in the 1880’s which was described as being ‘little more than an open sewer, the stench of which gave rise to continual complaints by residents.’ One article described the river as being ‘filled with black mud, which was simply sewage matter washed into the river.’ It is inconceivable that Sam would ever think of putting his much-loved animals into such a stinking quagmire. There is some anecdotal evidence that circus elephants were indeed bathed from what is now called the Elephant Walk in Priory Terrace in the 20th century but if anyone can supply documentary evidence of Sam ever bathing his animals in the Leam I would be delighted to receive it and re-write this article.

Elephants for Sale. Sam married his second wife Harriett at St Matthews church in Brixton in 1898 and the couple moved to a large detached house next to Milverton Station in Warwick New Road. By the turn of the century he was beginning to wind down his professional involvement with elephants. A notice in Bill Board magazine in November 1900 informed the readers that ‘Sam Lockhart has sold the five elephants that had been with the show for a long time to Ringlings.’ He carried out engagements in North America in 1902 and 1903 and a performance in Detroit that year was billed as ‘the last of these elephants which have been sold to James A Barnum of the Barnum & Bailey circus.’ The following year Sam received the terrible news that his brother George who had also pursued a parallel career as an elephant trainer had been crushed to death by one of his elephants that was being unloaded from a rail wagon at Walthamstow in London.

The last record of Sam appearing with his elephants comes in 1910/11 when he was on the bill at the Theatre Royal in Leamington with four elephants Mustard, Salt, Vinegar and Little Saucy. Sam lived in Leamington up until his death in 1933, Harriett survived him and died in 1938. The couple never had a family and are buried in Milverton Cemetery. By the time of his death Sam had become a fairly wealthy man and left estate valued at £15,324. What is clear is that the sums of money commanded by such circus acts in the late nineteenth century were phenomenal. It is reported that Sam Lockhart was paid $1,000 a week for a 52 week season when four of his elephants appeared with the Ringling Circus in America. The well-groomed little man rose from comparative obscurity to become one of the most significant figures in the Victorian and Edwardian entertainment business. He was a kindly, generous man who had a great love of the animals that he had owned and nurtured for many years. His efforts brought great enjoyment to generations of circus-goers many of whom were entertained at Sam’s expense. Whether he did or did not bathe his elephants in the river is in most respects irrelevant, his achievements speak for themselves.

Leamington and elephants. Did you know that there was an elephant wash in Leamington? (Yes, I thought it was a leg-pull too when I first heard it!) The first elephant trainer in England was Sam Lockhart, born to a circus family in Leamington in 1850. Sam brought three elephants back from Ceylon and taught them tricks. His circus was a grand building by the River Leam (where the Loft Theatre is now). The elephants were taken down to bathe in the river beside the main Post Office. However their trumpeting disturbed worshippers in the parish church nearby so it was decided to move the animal wash further away. A plan for this appears in an application to the Quarter Session minutes of 1882.

The ramp down into the river can still be seen next to the Mill Road foot bridge, with a plaque explaining its function

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This Used To Be My Playground

Madonna

This used to be my playground (used to be)
This used to be my childhood dream
This used to be the place I ran to
Whenever I was in need
Of a friend
Why did it have to end
And why do they always say

Don’t look back
Keep your head held high
Don’t ask them why
Because life is short
And before you know
You’re feeling old
And your heart is breaking
Don’t hold on to the past
Well that’s too much to ask

Live and learn
Well the years they flew
And we never knew
We were foolish then
We would never tire
And that little fire
Is still alive in me
It will never go away
Can’t say goodbye to yesterday (can’t say goodbye)

No regrets
But I wish that you
Were here with me
Well then there’s hope yet
I can see your face
In our secret place
You’re not just a memory
Say goodbye to yesterday (the dream)
Those are words I’ll never say (I’ll never say)

This used to be my playground (used to be)
This used to be our pride and joy
This used to be the place we ran to
That no one in the world could dare destroy

This used to be our playground (used to be)
This used to be our childhood dream
This used to be the place we ran to
I wish you were standing here with me

This used to be our playground (used to be)
This used to be our great escape
This used to be the place we ran to
This used to be our secret hiding place

This used to be our playground (used to be)
This used to be our childhood dream
This used to be the place we ran to
The best things in life are always free
Wishing you were here with me

Take A Bow

Madonna

Take a bow, the night is over
This masquerade is getting older
Light are low, the curtains down
There’s no one here (There’s no one here, there’s no one in the crowd)

Say your lines but do you feel them
Do you mean what you say when there’s no one around (No one around)
Watching you, watching me,
One lonely star (One lonely star you don’t know who you are)

I’ve always been in love with you (Always with you)
I guess you’ve always known it’s true (You know it’s true)
You took my love for granted, why oh why
The show is over, say good-bye

Say good-bye (Bye bye), say good-bye

Make them laugh, it comes so easy
When you get to the part
Where you’re breaking my heart (Breaking my heart)
Hide behind your smile,
All the world loves a clown (Just make ’em smile the whole world loves a clown)
Wish you well, I cannot stay
You deserve an award for the role that you played (Role that you played)
No more masquerade,
You’re one lonely star (One lonely star and you don’t know who you are)

I’ve always been in love with you (Always with you)
I guess you’ve always known it’s true (You know it’s true)
You took my love for granted, why oh why
The show is over, say good-bye

I’ve always been in love with you (Always with you)
I guess you’ve always known it’s true (You know it’s true)
You took my love for granted, why oh why
The show is over, say good-bye

Say good-bye (Bye bye), say good-bye

All the world is a stage (World is a stage)
And everyone has their part (Has their part)
But how was I to know which way the story’d go
How was I to know you’d break (You’d break, you’d break, you’d break)
You’d break my heart

I’ve always been in love with you (I’ve always been in love with you)
Guess you’ve always known
You took my love for granted, why oh why
The show is over, say good-bye

I’ve always been in love with you (Always with you)
I guess you’ve always known it’s true (You know it’s true)
You took my love for granted, why oh why
The show is over, say good-bye

Say good-bye (Bye bye), say good-bye
Say good-bye

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Monday 3rd September 2018

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 4, 2018 by bishshat

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Sunday 2nd September 2018

Posted in Life the Universe and Other Things on September 3, 2018 by bishshat

Watford 2 Spurs 1

Two headers from set pieces saw Watford come back from a goal down to win 2-1 at Vicarage Road on Sunday afternoon.

After dominating the first 45 minutes without really hitting our stride, we got our noses in front when Abdoulaye Doucoure turned Lucas Moura’s cross into his own net.

But an aerial double from the hosts inside a seven-minute spell saw the scoreline turned upside down, Troy Deeney guiding a header from a free-kick past Michel Vorm and Craig Cathcart converting from a corner to ensure Watford maintained their 100 per cent start to the season at the expense of our own.

 

It was the first time Watford have got the better of us in the Premier League era. Indeed, you have to go back to May, 1987, for the last time the Hornets claimed maximum points in top-flight action.
The first period brought some tidy work in the middle third and strong hold-up play by Harry Kane as we won seven corners to Watford’s one, but a paucity of clear shooting chances saw the match remain without score.

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Dele Alli cunningly guided a looping header from Toby Alderweireld’s ball forward over the advancing Ben Foster but also over the bar 12 minutes in, while Deeney subsequently headed Watford’s best chance of the half over Vorm’s bar in the Dutch goalkeeper’s first appearance of the season.

Dele sprung Lucas through Watford’s defence on 22 minutes and the forward produced a nice first touch, but the retreating Christian Kabasele did just enough to prevent him from pulling the trigger, while Dele himself was relieved to see the off-side flag go up after failing to convert Christian Eriksen’s cross with half-time on the horizon.

The breakthrough arrived eight minutes into the second period with Watford unable to cope with our spell of pressure around their box. Dele’s chip into the danger zone saw the hosts get their wires crossed with the ball spilling out to Lucas on the right, his delivery turned into his own net at the near post by the retreating Doucoure.

From there, we had to defend our box under heavy pressure from the hosts and after Deeney’s venomous cross spun off Alderweireld’s head and hit the crossbar, Watford drew level in the 69th minute when Jose Holebas’ in-swinging free-kick was headed home by the Hornets’ skipper.
Seven minutes later, after more Watford pressure, a corner was delivered into the box and Cathcart shook himself free to send a header flying inside the near post.

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Our best chance to level also came from an aerial assault, Kane heading onto the top of the net from Kieran Trippier’s delivery while Eriksen’s injury-time free-kick was flicked behind.

Deeney’s header kick-started Watford’s comeback. It came amid a spell of pressure from the hosts as we failed to push on after a fortuitous opener and was followed within seven minutes by Cathcart’s winning goal. Watford had all the momentum once Deeney found the net.

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“It’s disappointing and a very painful defeat,” said Mauricio Pochettino. “I think it was an even game in the second half and it’s disappointing when you score, 1-0 up and then to concede two goals in that way. It’s very, very disappointing – there’s not another word to find.

“This is the reality if you don’t fight in the way that you need to fight. To play football is one thing, to compete is different. Today in the first half I think we didn’t compete in the way we should to win and be a contender.”

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“Its A Boy”!

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